Reflections In Hindsight

Grace in the Rearview Mirror…it's closer than it appears

  • Ephesians 4:29

    Do not let any unwholesome talk come out of your mouths, but only what is helpful for building others up according to their needs, that it may benefit those who listen. (NIV)

    **MATERIAL ON THIS SITE IS COPYRIGHT PROTECTED. For permission on reprints or reusing this material, please contact the individual authors. For sharing the actual post, please use the share buttons.

  • Blog Archives

  • Blog Stats

    • 91,102 hits
  • RSS April’s Blog: A Writer’s Journey

    • Evil Parents and Rotten Kids
      A-ZE is for Evil Parents and Rotten KidsI present you Jimmy Kimmel's annual "I Told My Kids I Ate All Their Halloween Candy" video montage. It's an artful mixture of cruelty, humor, and ghastly awe. My favorite is Drawer Boy. Now there's an ax murderer in the making.Which is your favorite?
      noreply@blogger.com (April Gardner)
  • RSS Barn Door Book Loft

    • A Warm Welcome to K.D. Harp
      Can you tell us a bit about your family, and what it is like where you live?I live with the world’s finest husband and son and most skilled mooch of a dog in a suburb of Atlanta much like fictional Spencer. It’s big enough to have big box stores and fast food chains, small enough you recognize the cars on the highway and Mom ‘n Pop restaurants have a fightin […]
    • Interview with Christian Author James R. Callan
      Welcome to the Barn Door Book Loft, Mr. Callan.Question:Is there a story behind Over My Dead Body?James:  To some extent, yes. The use of eminent domain for private companies has long been an irritant for me. The Fifth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution limited eminent domain to “public use.” President George W. Bush issued an executive order limiting eminen […]
    • James Callan's Mystery, OVer My Dead Body
      Back Cover Blurb: A large corporation is taking land by eminent domain.  Syd Cranzler stands in its way, threatening a court battle. After a heated meeting with the corporation representative, Syd is found dead from an overdose of heart medication.  The police call it suicide. Case closed. But Father Frank, Syd’s pastor, and Georgia Peitz, another member of […]
  • RSS Clash of the Titles

    • March Release Clash
      Welcome to our March release Clash! Spring is coming, and we have some amazing backyard patio reads for you. Take a look at the compelling covers below and answer one question: Which one is a MUST for your to-be-read pile?Go ahead and vote below. Be sure to check back for the winner on Thursday, April 30!Follow the Amazon link below each book if you want to […]
    • COTT brings you "Entrusted" by Julie Arduini
      If you enjoy a sweet romance in a quaint village, you’ll love Julie Arduini’s debut novel. She fills the town with delightful and insightful characters. The story has a good balance of humor, wisdom and love. Buy this book, wrap up in a warm blanket with a cup of team, and snuggle in for a great read.                                                          […]
    • 2015 Olympia Winner!
      by Michelle MassaroGood morning, lovers of the written word! We have some big news to share today: The Olympia has a winner!******Please give a virtual hand to Kelly Goshorn!!BioKelly Goshorn is an aspiring novelist currently masquerading as a virtual assistant and a Target cashier who believes everybody needs a little more love and romance in their life. Ev […]
  • RSS Little Bits Blog

    • Chloe's Decision 
      As I stated last week, November is NANOWRIMO. I'm working on the next Stones Creek novel. It's the story of Chloe, Noah Preston's sister. She comes to Stones Creek with her two children. If you would like to read her pre-story simply subscribe to Sophie's Special Emails. No more than twice a month will you receive an email with special co […]
    • Remembering Fudgsicles
      It is November and thus NANOWRIMO, National Novel Writing Month. The challenge is to begin a novel and write 50,000 words during the month. Since this occupies most of my focus for these four weeks I will be reposting previous articles each week this month. Fudgsicles, how long has it been since I’ve had a fudgsicle? I’m not sure, but they came to mind when […]
    • Are You Teachable?
      What? You think you know everything? I'm sorry to be the bearer of bad news but no one knows everything. Oh, there is one, Hashem. He's omniscient. But no one else is. Even Yeshua (Jesus) isn't. He doesn't know the hour or day he will come again. Some people rejoice in learning something new. I tend to be one of those people. I read about […]
  • RSS Living Our Faith Out Loud

    • Book review: Jordan's Shadow by Robin Johns Grant
      Jordan’s ShadowRobin Johns GrantCan’t stop reading!February 2015Print 12.99E book: 2.99Buy on AmazonFrom the Publisher:The Crosby family has a frightening problem. Is it psychological? Supernatural? Or something entirely unexpected?In 1984, seventeen-year-old Rose and her fiancé discover an injured girl with no memory. The girl, Jordan, is in Rose’s life for […]
    • Book review: Historical novella Acres of Dreams by Sharon McGregor
      Acres of Dreams book reviewSharon McGregorShort Historical InspirationFrom the Publisher: Katy is a nineteen year old girl sent to Canada by her family in the late 1890s to find a suitable husband. Katy has other plans however--she wants a career, not marriage. During the round of social activities arranged by her sister, she is drawn against her will toward […]
    • Emma Right, Children's books, Kindle Fire giveaway
      Synopsis Of While Princesses Sleep, Book 1 of the Princesses OF Chadwick Castle Seriesby Emma RightWhile Princesses Sleep: Princesses of Chadwick Castle Adventure, Book 1 (Princess Castle Adventure Mystery series) is a tale of two royal sisters who are princesses.1. While Princesses SleepThe Princesses Of Chadwick Castle Adventure is an eight-book series set […]
  • RSS Nearly Brilliant

    • Book Review: Sail Upon the Land by Josa Young
      The prologue of this book starts in India with the rape of Damson a sheltered young woman. From there it takes us back to the 1930's and traces forward through four generations of English women ending with Damson.  The superb writing and the sensitive treatment of real life circumstances such as depression, being born with physical challenges, pregnanci […]
    • Book Review: Storm Clouds Rolling in by Ginny Dye
      The first book in a series.  Carrie Cromwell has grown up on a Virginia plantation so she is used to the comfort of a privileged life and she’s an independent thinker. Slaves have always been a part of her lifestyle, but the older she gets the more she questions whether slavery is right or wrong. The story gives us both sides of the slavery issue including t […]
    • Book Review: By Eastern Windows by Gretta Curran Browne
      A unique historical romance that focuses on a male main character, Lachlan Macquarie. The book begins in Scotland with Macquarie as a young soldier, then moves to India where he rises through the ranks of the English military. He meets the love of his life, lovely  Jane Jarvis who has been raised in India but the happy marriage is short-lived. When tragedy s […]
  • BLOG NEWS

    Thank you for your encouragement and support for the past three years. We've had fun connecting with you and hope you've found useful material here on Reflections. And here's the but... Reflections In Hindsight is closing on December 21, 2012. Elaine and Sophie and I can be found over at http://authorculture.blogspot.com; April can be found at Clash of the Titles, http://www.clashofthetitles, http://www.aprilgardner.com and watch for news for more novels from her!; Janet is ever-present on the Internet with her very special words of wisdom and grace at http://www.janetperezeckles.com, and Luther--who knows where he'll show up next, but I'd watch my back if I were you... Book Reviews are always important, so I, Lisa, will continue to offer them through my blog, as well as those promotions for your new books or book launches, or your news.
  • Second Monday: Sophie Dawson

  • Tuesdays – Promotion in Motion

  • Wednesdays: Life of a Writer – April & Positivity – Lisa Lickel

  • Thursdays – Luther’s on board

  • Fridays – Revolutionary Faith, Devotions by Elaine

  • Saturdays – Janet Perez Eckles

  • Sunday – Reflections Book Reviews

  • Blog Authors

  • The Barn Door

  • The Barn Door Book Loft. Free Books! Book Giveaways.

  • John 3:16 Marketing Network widget and many other great free widgets at Widgetbox! Not seeing a widget? (More info)>

Would’st Thou Be My Valentine?

Posted by elainemcooper on February 10, 2012

Posted by Elaine Marie Cooper

Love in the American colonies. SIGH

It surely abounded since the population grew quite steadily through the years. But was there an official day set aside for love called Valentine’s Day? The answer is “yes”…and “no.”

While Valentine’s Day had existed for centuries, not all of the colonies celebrated the holiday. The New England colonies were known for avoiding any celebrations that they deemed unscriptural, including Christmas. But many of the European immigrants, especially the Dutch, carried the romantic tradition to the New World.

Celebrations of a holiday focused on love go waaaay back in history—all the way to the pagan festivals in Rome. Eventually the celebration became more civilized through the tale of a priest named Valentine, who secretly married lovers that had been banned from matrimony by a military leader. Valentine was subsequently imprisoned. As legend has it, the grateful lovers brought gifts of cards and flowers to the prisoner while he was in his jail cell. Unfortunately, the defender of love was martyred. Definitely not a happy day for Valentine.

Some of the ways the Colonial Americans celebrated St. Valentine’s Day were downright peculiar to our modern sensibilities. For instance, in Marriage Customs of the World: From Henna to Honeymoons, by George Monger, he quotes an excerpt from “The Connoisseur,” a series of essays published from 1754 to 1756 where some interesting Valentine’s Day traditions were described:

“Last Friday was Valentine’s Day and the night before I got five bay leaves, and pinned four of them to the four corners of my pillow and the fifth to the middle; and then if I dreamt of my sweetheart, Betty said we should be married before the year was out. But to make it more sure, I boiled an egg hard and took out the yolk and filled it with salt, and then I went to bed and ate it, shell and all, without speaking or drinking after it. We also wrote our lovers names upon bits of paper and then rolled them up in clay and put them into water, and the first that rose up was to be our valentine.”

Betty must have been a trustworthy authority on love. :-)

There was also a tradition that the first man that a maiden would see on Valentine’s Day would be the one she would marry. This practice undoubtedly caused numerous stubbed toes while girls with tightly-shut eyes waited for the signal from a friend that the one they desired was in close proximity.

While the first known written Valentine message was sent in 1684, handwritten notes to celebrate love on February 14 started becoming popular in 1750. The homemade sentiments were replaced by mass-produced cards in the mid nineteenth century. It was a hallmark moment. ;-)

So you can celebrate Valentine’s Day like the colonials with some bay leaves and eggs. But I would prefer a few chocolates myself. And if my Valentine wants to make me a handwritten sentiment, I will feel like a blessed colonial woman indeed.

I will end with a quote from Ophelia in Shakespeare’s Hamlet:

 

“Tomorrow is St. Valentine’s Day,
All in the morning be-time,
And I a maid at your window,
To be your Valentine.”

Happy Valentine’s Day! May your day be filled with the company of those you love.

About these ads

4 Responses to “Would’st Thou Be My Valentine?”

  1. Wow, I learned a lot! Had never heard the origins of Valentines. Poor dude! Good stuff, Elaine.

  2. Good job! Lots of research, my favorite…
    My fav thing I learned earlier is that pink used to be the “baby boy” color because it was “passionate.”

    • That must have been before they realized how “passionate” girls can be as well! ;-) I had never heard that. But I think I will still refrain from buying pink shirts for my grandsons…LOL. Thanks for commenting and teaching me something new!

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.

 
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,247 other followers

%d bloggers like this: